Rubidium meaning

ro͝o-bĭdē-əm
A soft silvery-white metallic element of the alkali group that ignites spontaneously in air and reacts violently with water, used in photocells and as a getter in the manufacture of vacuum tubes. Atomic number 37; atomic weight 85.47; melting point 39.30°C; boiling point 688°C; specific gravity (solid) 1.532; valence 1, 2, 3, 4.
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A soft, silvery-white, metallic chemical element, one of the alkali metals, that ignites spontaneously in air and reacts violently in water: used in photocells and in filaments of vacuum tubes: symbol, Rb; at. no. 37
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A soft, silvery-white metallic element of the alkali group. It ignites spontaneously in air and reacts violently with water. Rubidium is used in photoelectric cells, in making vacuum tubes, and in radiometric dating. Atomic number 37; atomic weight 85.47; melting point 38.89°C; boiling point 688°C; specific gravity (solid) 1.532; valence 1, 2, 3, 4.
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A metallic chemical element (symbol Rb) with an atomic number of 37.
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Origin of rubidium

  • From Latin rūbidus red reudh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • A New Latin word derived by German chemist R. W. Bunsen in 1861, from Latin rubidus (“red") because its spectrum has two red lines.

    From Wiktionary