Pythagorean-theorem meaning

pĭ-thăgə-rēən
The theorem that the sum of the squares of the lengths of the sides of a right triangle is equal to the square of the length of the hypotenuse.
noun
1
0
The theorem that in a right triangle the hypotenuse squared is equal to the sum of the squares of the other sides (i.e., c2 = a2 + b2)
noun
1
0
The definition of the Pythagorean Theorem is a mathmatical relationship of the lengths of the sides in a right triangle - if you square the length of the two shorter sides and add them together, that will equal the length of the longest side squared.

An example of the Pythagorean Theorem is a 3 x 4 x 5 triangle - 3 squared is 9, 4 squared is 16, and 5 squared is 25. 9 plus 16 equals 25.

noun
0
0
A theorem stating that the square of the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the lengths of the other sides. It is mathematically stated as c2 = a2 + b2 , where c is the length of the hypotenuse and a and b the lengths of the other two sides.
0
0
(geometry) A mathematical theorem which states that the square of the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of those of the two other sides.

The Pythagorean theorem only applies to right triangles.

pronoun
0
0
Advertisement
(functional analysis) A generalization of the Pythagorean theorem for Euclidean triangles to Hilbert spaces.
pronoun
0
0

Origin of pythagorean-theorem

  • Named after Pythagoras, from Ancient Greek Πυθαγόρας (Pythagoras), Greek mathematician and philosopher who by tradition is credited with theorem's discovery and proof.

    From Wiktionary