Physics meaning

fĭzĭks
Physics is the science of energy and matter and how they relate to each other.

An example of physics is the study of quantum mechanics.

An example of physics is electrocution.

noun
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The science of matter and energy and of interactions between the two, grouped in traditional fields such as acoustics, optics, mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism, as well as in modern extensions including atomic and nuclear physics, cryogenics, solid-state physics, particle physics, and plasma physics.
noun
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The behavior of a given physical system, especially as understood by a physical theory.
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Plural form of physic.
noun
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Of or pertaining to the physical aspects of a phenomenon or a system, especially those studied in physics.

The physics of car crashes would not let Tom Cruise walk away like that.

noun
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The scientific study of matter, energy, space, and time, and of the relations between them.
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Physical properties, interactions, processes, or laws.

The physics of supersonic flight.

noun
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The science of matter and energy, and their properties and interactions in fields including mechanics, acoustics, optics, heat, electricity, magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear science. Physics is the science of how things work.
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Natural philosophy.
noun
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The study of the natural or material world and phenomena; natural philosophy.
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Third-person singular simple present indicative form of physic.
verb
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The branch of science concerned with the study of properties and interactions of space, time, matter and energy.

Newtonian physics was extended by Einstein to explain the effects of travelling near the speed of light; quantum physics extends it to account for the behaviour of atoms.

noun
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Physical properties or processes.

The physics of flight.

pluralNoun
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The science of the behavior of the physical world. Stemming from the Greek "physis," which means the characteristics of nature, physics covers the structure of matter (atoms, particles, etc.) and a huge variety of subjects, including chemical bonding, gravity, space, time, electromagnetism, electromagnetic radiation, the theory of relativity, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics.
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A book or treatise on any of these.
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Origin of physics

  • From Latin physica from Greek (ta) phusika (the things) of nature from neuter pl. of phusikos physic

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek φυσικός (phusikos, “natural")

    From Wiktionary