Pectin meaning

pĕktĭn
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Any of a group of water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates of high molecular weight found in ripe fruits, such as apples, plums, and grapefruit, and used to jell various foods, drugs, and cosmetics.
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A water-soluble carbohydrate, obtained from certain ripe fruits, which yields a gel that is the basis of jellies and jams.
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Any of a group of water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates of high molecular weight found in ripe fruits, such as apples, plums, and grapefruit, and used to jell various foods, drugs, and cosmetics.
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(biochemistry) A polysaccharide extracted from the cell walls of plants, especially of fruits; under acidic conditions it forms a gel. It is often used in processed foods, especially jellies and jams where it causes thickening (setting).

Apple is rich in pectin and so is often added to other fruits when making jam so it will set.

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Any of a group of carbohydrate substances found in the cell walls of plants and in the tissue between certain plant cells. Pectin is produced by the ripening of fruit and helps the ripe fruit remain firm. As the fruit overripens, the pectin breaks down into simple sugars (monosaccharides) and the fruit loses its shape and becomes soft. Pectins can be made to form gels, and are used in certain medicines and cosmetics and in making jellies.
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Origin of pectin

  • French pectine from Greek pēktos coagulated from pēgnunai to coagulate pag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition