Madrigal meaning

mădrĭ-gəl
A short poem, usually a love poem, which can be set to music.
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A part song, esp. an often contrapuntal song popular in the 15th, 16th, and 17th cent.
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(music) A song for a small number of unaccompanied voices; from 13th century Italy.
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(music) A polyphonic song for about six voices, from 16th century Italy.
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A short poem, often pastoral, and suitable to be set to music.
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Origin of madrigal

  • Italian madrigale probably from dialectal madregal simple from Late Latin mātrīcālis invented, original from Latin of the womb from mātrīx mātrīc- womb from māter mātr- mother mater

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Italian madrigale, from Latin mātrÄ«cālis.

    From Wiktionary