Liaison meaning

lē-āzŏn, lēā-
Communication between two parties or groups.
noun
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A sexual relationship, especially when at least one person is married or involved in a sexual relationship with someone else.
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Liaison is defined as someone who links people.

An example of a liaison is an ambassador who communicates between two countries politically.

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A person who functions as a connection or go-between, as between persons or groups.
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A linking up or connecting of two or more separate entities or of the parts, as military units, of a whole so that they can work together effectively.
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Co-operation, working together.
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(linguistics) Pronunciation of the usually silent final consonant of a word when followed by a word beginning with a vowel, especially in French.
noun
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An illicit love affair.
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In spoken French, the linking of words, under certain conditions, by pronouncing the final consonant, ordinarily silent, of one word as though it were the initial consonant of the following word (Ex.: the phrase chez elle is pronounced ′shā zel)
noun
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A relayer of information between two forces in an army or during war.
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A tryst, romantic meeting.
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(figuratively) An illicit sexual relationship or affair.
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(linguistics) The phonological fusion of two consecutive words and the manner in which this occurs, for example intrusion, consonant-vowel linking, etc. In the context of some languages, such as French, liaison can refer specifically to a normally silent final consonant, being pronounced when the next word begins with a vowel, and can often also include the intrusion of a "t" in certain fixed chunks of language such as the question form "pense-t-il".
noun
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(proscribed) To liaise.
verb
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The definition of liaison is a meeting in secret.

An example of liaison is a couple secretly meeting at a hotel.

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To serve as a liaison.
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Origin of liaison

  • French from Old French from Latin ligātiō ligātiōn- from ligātus past participle of ligāre to bind ligate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French liaison (“binding"), from Latin ligatio (stem ligation-) (English ligation), derived from ligō, from Proto-Indo-European *leygÊ°- (“to bind").

    From Wiktionary