Lenz-s-law meaning

lĕntsĭz
The principle stating that an electric current induced by a source such as a changing magnetic field always creates a counterforce opposing the force inducing it. The law accounts for such phenomena as diamagnetism and the electrical properties of inductors.
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A principle stating that an electric current, induced by a source such as a changing magnetic field, always creates a counterforce opposing the force inducing it. This law explains such phenomena as diamagnetism and the electrical properties of inductors. The law is named after its discoverer, German physicist Heinrich Lenz (1804–1865).
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(physics) A law of electromagnetic induction which states that an electromotive force, induced in a conductor, is always in such a direction that the current it would produce would oppose the change which caused it; it is a form of the law of conservation of energy.
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Origin of lenz-s-law

  • After Heinrich Friedrich Emil Lenz (1804–1865), German physicist born in Livonia who formulated the principle

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Heinrich Lenz German physicist

    From Wiktionary