Information-theory meaning

The theory of the probability of transmission of messages with specified accuracy when the bits of information constituting the messages are subject, with certain probabilities, to transmission failure, distortion, and accidental additions.
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The study of processes of communication and the transmission of messages; specif., the study of the information content of messages and of the probabilistic measurement of signal recognition in the presence of interference, noise, etc.
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A branch of mathematics that mathematically defines and analyzes the concept of information. Information theory involves statistics and probability theory, and applications include the design of systems that have to do with data transmission, encryption, compression, and other information processing.
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The study of encoding and transmitting information. From Claude Shannon's 1948 paper, "A Mathematical Theory of Communication," which proposed the use of binary digits for coding information. Shannon said that all information has a "source rate" that can be measured in bits per second and requires a transmission channel with a capacity equal to or greater than the source rate.
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(mathematics) A branch of applied mathematics and engineering involving the quantification of information sent over a communication channel, disregarding the meaning of the sent messages, exemplified by the noisy-channel coding theorem.
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