Herye meaning

14thC, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Clerk's Prologue and Tale, 2002, Marion Wynne-Davies (edit), The Tales of The Clerk and The Wife of Bath, page 94,

And whan that folk it to his fader tolde, / Nat oonly he, but al his contree merye / Was for this child, and God they thanke and herye.

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14thC, William de Shoreham, 1851, Early English Poetry, Ballads and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages, Volume 28, Percy Society, page 117,

Thyse aungeles heryeth here wyth stevene, / Ase he hys hare quene of he[ve]ne.

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1563, John Foxe, 1851, Fox's Book of Martyrs: The Acts and Monuments of the Church, Volume 1, page 563,

And Lord God, what herying is it to bilden thee a church of dead stones, and robben thy quicke churches of their bodilich liuelood?

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1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender: November, 2012, Marie Loughlin, Sandra Bell, Patricia Brace (editors), The Broadview Anthology of Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose, page 797,

Thenot, now nis the time of merimake. / Nor Pan to herye, nor with love to playe.

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Origin of herye

  • From Middle English heryen, herien, from Old English herian (“to extol, praise, commend, help”), from Proto-Germanic *hazjaną (“to call, praise”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱens- (“to speak in a florid, solemn style, attest, witness”). Cognate with Middle High German haren (“to call, shout”), Gothic (hazjan, “to praise”), Latin cēnseō (“inspect, appraise, estimate”, verb), Latin cēnsus (“estimation”); see censor, census.
    From Wiktionary