Hafnium meaning

hăfnē-əm
A brilliant, silvery, metallic element separated from ores of zirconium and used in nuclear reactor control rods, as a getter for oxygen and nitrogen, and in tungsten filament alloys. Atomic number 72; atomic weight 178.49; melting point 2,233°C; boiling point 4,603°C; specific gravity 13.31; valence 4.
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A metallic chemical element found with, and similar to, zirconium: used in the manufacture of light-bulb filaments and in reactor control rods: symbol, Hf; at. no. 72
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A bright, silvery metallic element that occurs in zirconium ores. Because hafnium absorbs neutrons better than any other metal and is resistant to corrosion, it is used to control nuclear reactions. Atomic number 72; atomic weight 178.49; melting point 2,220°C; boiling point 5,400°C; specific gravity 13.3; valence 4.
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A chemical element that resembles zirconium. It is used to absorb neutrons in nuclear power generation, as an alloy with tungsten for filaments and electrodes and as an insulator in transistors. For example, by reducing energy leakage in the transistor's dielectric region, hafnium enabled Intel to produce 45 nm microprocessors in 2007 (see High-K/Metal Gate).
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A metallic chemical element (symbol Hf) with an atomic number of 72.
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Origin of hafnium

  • After Hafnia , Medieval Latin name for Copenhagen, Denmark

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin Hafnia (“Copenhagen”).

    From Wiktionary