Daylight-saving-time meaning

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Time during which clocks are set one hour or more ahead of standard time to provide more daylight at the end of the working day during late spring, summer, and early fall.
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Standard time that is one hour later than the standard time for a given zone based on mean solar time: it is used to give an hour more of daylight at the end of the usual working day.
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Time during which clocks are set one hour or more ahead of standard time to provide more daylight at the end of the working day during late spring, summer, and early fall. First proposed by Benjamin Franklin, daylight saving time was instituted in various countries during both world wars in the 20th century and was made permanent in most of the United States beginning in 1973. Arizona, Hawaii, most of eastern Indiana, and certain US territories and possessions do not observe daylight saving time.
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An adjustment of the official time during summer to cause events to be scheduled during daylight hours.
  • 2005: answers.firstgov.gov -- Daylight Saving Time is a change in the standard time of each time zone. ... The American law by which we turn our clock forward in the spring and back in the fall is known as the Uniform Time Act of 1966. The law does not require that anyone observe Daylight Saving Time; all the law requires is that if we are going to observe Daylight Saving Time, it must be done uniformly. [1].
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