Collation meaning

kə-lā'shən, kŏ-, kō-
The definition of collation is the act of assembling people or elements into an order for a specific purpose.

When you put papers into the order that they need to be in, this is an example of collation.

noun
1
0
The act or process of collating.
noun
1
0
The act, process, or result of collating.
noun
1
0
A conference or gathering, as of monks at the close of the day to listen to a reading from a religious book and to discuss it.
noun
1
0
A light meal: originally such a meal was served in a monastery during the collation.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The physical description of a book, including the trim size, number of pages and illustrations, etc.
noun
0
0
The addition to the estate of an intestate of the value of the advancements made by the intestate to his or her children so that the estate can be divided in accordance with an intestacy statute. See also advancement.
noun
0
0
Bringing together.
noun
0
0
A reading held from the work mentioned above, as a regular service in Benedictine monasteries. [from 14th c.]
noun
0
0
The light meal taken by monks after the reading service mentioned above. [from 14th c.]
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any light meal or snack. [from 16th c.]
noun
0
0
(ecclesiastical) The presentation of a clergyman to a benefice by a bishop, who has it in his own gift.
noun
0
0
(law, Scotland) An heir's right to combine the whole heritable and movable estates of the deceased into one mass, sharing it equally with others who are of the same degree of kindred.
noun
0
0
(obsolete) To partake of a collation, or light meal.
verb
0
0
(in the plural) The Collationes Patrum in Scetica Eremo Commorantium by John Cassian, an important ecclesiastical work. (Now usually with capital initial.) [from 13th c.]
noun
0
1
Advertisement

Origin of collation

  • From Old French collation, from Latin collationem, from the participle stem of conferre (“to bring together”).
    From Wiktionary