Cold-war meaning

The definition of cold war is hostility between areas, states or nations without physical fighting.

An example of a cold war was the relationship between the USA and the USSR after World War II.

noun
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A state of political tension and military rivalry between nations that stops short of full-scale war, especially that which existed between the United States and Soviet Union following World War II.
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A state of rivalry and tension between two factions, groups, or individuals that stops short of open, violent confrontation.
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A conflict between nations that act with hostility toward one another but do not engage in direct warfare.
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A period of hostile relations between rivals where direct open warfare between them is largely undesired and avoided.
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The period of hostility short of open war between the Soviet Bloc and the Western powers, especially the United States, 1945–91.
pronoun
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the Cold War
  • The protracted cold war (1945–91) between the non-Communist and Communist countries, esp. between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, in which each side attempted to check the global power and influence of the other: the Cold War was characterized by a buildup of large military forces and nuclear arsenals, military interventions as in Asia and Africa, the use of propaganda and espionage, etc.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Cold War