Cerebrum meaning

sĕrə-brəm, sə-rē-
The cerebrum is the largest part of the brain upper and is the main part of the brain of vertebrate animals. It has left and right hemispheres. The cerebrum controls conscious and voluntary processess.
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The large rounded structure of the brain occupying most of the cranial cavity, divided into two cerebral hemispheres that are joined at the bottom by the corpus callosum. It controls and integrates motor, sensory, and higher mental functions, such as thought, reason, emotion, and memory.
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The large rounded structure of the brain occupying most of the cranial cavity, divided into two cerebral hemispheres that are joined at the bottom by the corpus callosum. It controls and integrates motor, sensory, and higher mental functions, such as thought, reason, emotion, and memory.
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The upper, main part of the brain of vertebrate animals, consisting of left and right hemispheres: in humans it is the largest part of the brain and is believed to control conscious and voluntary processes.
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The largest part of the vertebrate brain, filling most of the skull and consisting of two cerebral hemispheres divided by a deep groove and joined by the corpus callosum, a transverse band of nerve fibers. The cerebrum processes complex sensory information and controls voluntary muscle activity. In humans it is the center of thought, learning, memory, language, and emotion.
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(neuroanatomy) The upper part of the brain, which is divided into the two cerebral hemispheres. In humans it is the largest part of the brain and is the seat of motor and sensory functions, and the higher mental functions such as consciousness, thought, reason, emotion, and memory.
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Origin of cerebrum

  • Latin brain ker-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin cerebrum (“brain, skull”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₁- (reduced *ḱr̥h₁-). Cognate with Ancient Greek κάρα (kára, “head”), Old High German hirni (“brain”), Old English hærn (“brain”). More at harns.

    From Wiktionary