Cavitation meaning

kăvĭ-tāshən
The pitting of a solid surface.
noun
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The sudden formation and collapse of low-pressure bubbles in liquids by means of mechanical forces, such as those resulting from rotation of a marine propeller.
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(medicine) The formation of cavities in a body tissue or an organ, especially those formed in the lung as a result of tuberculosis.
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The sudden formation and collapse of low-pressure bubbles in liquids by means of mechanical forces, such as those resulting from rotation of a marine propeller.
noun
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The pitting of a solid surface.
noun
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(medicine) The formation of cavities in a body tissue or an organ, especially those formed in the lung as a result of tuberculosis.
noun
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The formation of bubblelike gaps in a liquid. Mechanical forces, such as the moving blades of a ship's propeller or sudden negative changes in pressure, can cause cavitation.
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The formation of pits on a surface.
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(biology) The formation of cavities in an organ, especially in lung tissue as a result of tuberculosis.
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The formation of partial vacuums within a flowing liquid as a result of mechanical force, as with a boat propeller or a pump impeller: when these collapse, pitting or other damage is caused on metal surfaces in contact.
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(sciences) The formation, in a fluid, of vapor bubbles that rapidly collapse; especially in a rotating marine propeller or pump impeller.
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Origin of cavitation

  • From cavity

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition