Apricot definition

ăprĭ-kŏt, āprĭ-
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A moderate, light, or strong orange to strong orange-yellow.
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Any of various prunus trees bearing this fruit.
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A deciduous tree (Prunus armeniaca) native to Asia, having alternate leaves and clusters of usually white flowers.
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The edible orange-yellow fruit of this tree.
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A small, yellowish-orange fruit that is closely related to the peach and plum.
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A yellowish-orange color.
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A round sweet and juicy stone fruit, resembling peach or plum in taste, with a yellow-orange flesh, lightly fuzzy skin and a large seed inside.
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The apricot tree, Prunus armeniaca.
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A pale yellow-orange colour, like that of an apricot fruit.

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A dog with an orange-coloured coat.
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(sniper slang) The junction of the brain and brain stem on a target, used as an aiming point to ensure a one-shot kill.
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Of a pale yellowish-orange colour, like that of an apricot.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
apricot
Plural:
apricots

Origin of apricot

  • Alteration of earlier abrecock ultimately from Arabic al-barqūq the plum al- the barqūq plum (from Greek praikokion apricot) (from Latin praecoquus ripe early) (prae- pre-) (coquere to cook, ripen pekw- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Alteration (under the influence of French abricot) of apricock, itself an alteration (under influence of Latin apricum (“sunny place”)) of abrecock, from dialectal Catalan abrecoc, abercoc, variant of standard albercoc, from Arabic البرقوق (al-barqūq, “plums”), from Byzantine Greek βερικοκκία (berikokkia) (pl.), from Ancient Greek πραικὄκιον (praikokion), from Late Latin (persica) præcocia (pl.), (mālum) præcoquum, neuter of Latin (persicum) præcox, literally 'over-ripe peach'.

    From Wiktionary