Antistrophe meaning

ăn-tĭstrə-fē
The second stanza, and those like it, in a poem consisting of alternating stanzas in contrasting metrical form.
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The second division of the triad of a Pindaric ode, having the same stanza form as the strophe.
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In the ancient Greek theater,
  • The return movement, from left to right of the stage, made by the chorus in answering the previous strophe.
  • The part of the choric song performed during this.
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In a Pindaric ode, the stanza, usually in the same or similar form, which follows the strophe.
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In poems with contrasting or parallel stanza systems, a stanza of the second system.
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In Greek choruses and dances, the returning of the chorus, exactly answering to a previous strophe or movement from right to left. Hence: The lines of this part of the choral song.
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(rhetoric) The repetition of words in an inverse order.
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(rhetoric) The repetition of a word or phrase at the end of successive clauses.
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The retort or turning of an adversary's plea against him.
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Origin of antistrophe

  • Late Latin antistrophē antistrophe of Greek tragedy from Greek strophic correspondence from antistrephein to turn back anti- back anti– strephein to turn strophe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin, from Ancient Greek ἀντιστροφή (antistrophe, “turning about”).

    From Wiktionary