Analog meaning

ănə-lôg, -lŏg
Frequency:
Something that bears an analogy to something else; something that is comparable.
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The definition of analog is something that has some common traits with something else.

A burger made of soy is similar to a burger made of beef so it is an example of an analog.

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Of a system of measurement in which a continuously varying value, as sound, temperature, etc., corresponds proportionally to another value, esp. a voltage.
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Using hands, dials, etc. to show numerical amounts, as on a clock.
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A representation of an object that resembles the original. Analog devices monitor conditions, such as movement, temperature and sound, and convert them into "analogous" electronic or mechanical patterns. For example, an analog watch represents the planet's rotation with the rotating hands on the watch face. Analog telephones turn voice vibrations into electrical vibrations of the same shape. Analog implies a continuous signal in contrast with digital, which breaks everything into numbers. Analog video cameras scan their viewing area a line at a time and convert the infinitely varying intensities of red, green and blue (RGB) light into analogous electrical signals. See sampling.Analog Is Alive and WellAudio and video have been analog since the beginning of radio, TV and magnetic recording. While the industry is almost entirely digital today, analog exists in the form of AM/FM radio, and vinyl records are still being pressed, although nowhere near the volume in their heyday. Many home recordings on audio cassettes and VHS tapes are still around as well.Analog AdvantageThe ability to capture the infinite nature of the real world is the advantage of analog audio recording, which is why vinyl records have not disappeared. It takes huge digital capacities and bandwidth to match that same granularity. See vinyl record and high-resolution audio.Analog DisadvantageThe downside of analog is that once recorded, analog equipment cannot copy signals perfectly, no matter how advanced. Third and fourth generations of analog audio and video recordings show noticeable deterioration.In contrast, by recording in digital from the beginning, or by converting from analog to digital at an early stage, audio and video data can be preserved indefinitely and copied over and over without deterioration. This fact caused music and movie publishers great anguish and has always been a problem for software publishers. See copyright, DRM, peer-to-peer network and A/D converter.
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(biology) An organ or structure that is similar in function to one in another kind of organism but is of dissimilar evolutionary origin.
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Of, relating to, or being a device in which data or a signal is represented by continuously variable, measurable, physical quantities, such as length, width, voltage, or pressure.
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Of or by means of an analog computer.
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Of or having to do with transmission of a signal that varies continuously and analogously with the waveform of the voice or other source.

Analog TVs, telephones, and recordings.

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Analog is defined as a watch that uses hands moving around the face of the watch to indicate time, rather than digital numbers.

An example of analog is a watch where the big hand is on the 12 and the little hand on the 2.

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(biology) An organ or structure that is similar in function to one in another kind of organism but is of dissimilar evolutionary origin.
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(chemistry) A structural derivative of a parent compound that often differs from it by a single element.
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Relating to or being a device in which data or a signal is represented by continuously variable, measurable, physical quantities, such as length, width, voltage, or pressure.
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Measuring or representing data by means of one or more physical properties that can express any value along a continuous scale. For example, the position of the hands of a clock is an analog representation of time.
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An organ or structure that is similar in function to one in another kind of organism but is of dissimilar evolutionary origin. The wings of birds and the wings of insects are analogs.
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A chemical compound that has a similar structure and similar chemical properties to those of another compound, but differs from it by a single element or group. The antibiotic amoxicillin, for example, is an analog of penicillin, differing from the latter by the addition of an amino group.
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In telecommunications terms, an early technology that frequently has been superceded by digital technology. For example, to transmit sound in analog, as broadcast and telephone companies did, the frequency is altered by amplifying the strength of the signal or varying the frequency in order to transmit information. In contrast, digital, which is now the dominant technology, uses a series of electronic data represented by ones and zeros to store or transmit data.
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A continuously present and continuously variable signal. In their native, or original, forms, audio and visual signals are analog. An active audio signal is a stream-oriented, i.e., continuously present, acoustic signal. A visual signal is a stream-oriented optical signal. Audio and visual signals travel in a waveform that can vary continuously and infinitely along two parameters amplitude and frequency. Amplitude refers to signal intensity or signal strength, which manifests as volume in audio signals and brightness in visual signals. Frequency refers to the number of waveforms per second, or cycles per second (cps), known in contemporary terminology as Hertz (Hz). Frequency manifests as pitch, or tone, in audio signals, and as color in image and video signals.All electromagnetic energy travels in continuous waveforms.The portions of the electromagnetic spectrum currently usable for telecommunications include electricity, radio, and infrared light. See also digital, electromagnetic spectrum, and Hz.
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Pertaining to the representation of data in the form of a continuous signal.Transmission of voice, image, and video information are relatively straightforward as they are analog in their native forms. Appropriate conversions to electrical, radio, and optical energy must be made, of course, and adjustments must be made in terms of amplitude and frequency levels, but the native signals and electromagnetic transmission signals are quite compatible in terms of their common analog nature. In order to accomplish the transmission of these native analog signals, the carrier signal (i.e., information-carrying signal) of the transmission system is modulated (i.e., varied, or changed) in order to create an analog of the original information stream.The transmission of digital computer data over an analog network is quite another matter, as a fundamental conversion in signal format must be made through a modem. To accomplish this conversion over an electrified analog network, the ones (1s) and zeroes (0s) of the digital bit stream must be translated into amplitude and frequency variations of the carrier signal. The electromagnetic sinusoidal waveform, or sine wave, can be varied in amplitude at a fixed frequency, using Amplitude Modulation (AM). Alternatively, the frequency of the sine wave can be varied at constant amplitude, using Frequency Modulation (FM). Additionally, both frequency and amplitude can be modulated simultaneously. Finally, the position of the sine wave can be manipulated (actually, can appear to be manipulated), adding the third technique of Phase Modulation, also known as Phase Shift Keying (PSK). See also carrier, digital, and modem.
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Something that is continuously present and continuously variable. For example, the shadow cast by the gnomon on the flat plate of a sundial is continuously present and continuously variable, at least during the daylight hours. Similarly, the hands of an analog clock, watch, or fuel gauge are continuously present and continuously variable, or essentially so.
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(of a device or system) In which the value of a data item (such as time) is represented by a continuously variable physical quantity that can be measured (such as the shadow of a sundial)
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(countable) Something that bears an analogy to something else.
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(countable, biology) An organ or structure that is similar in function to one in another kind of organism but is of dissimilar evolutionary origin.
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(chemistry) A structural derivative of a parent compound that often differs from it by a single element.
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(chemistry) A structural derivative of a parent compound that often differs from it by a single element.
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Something that is analogous to or similar to something else.The electrical waveform of a voice transmission over an analog network is analogous to the waveform of the native acoustic voice signal.The movement of the hour hand of an analog watch or clock is analogous to the movement of the shadow cast by a sundial.
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Origin of analog

  • French analogue analogous, analog from Medieval Latin analogus from Greek analogos proportionate analogous

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Early 19th century; from French analogue, from Ancient Greek ἀνάλογος (analogos, “proportionate”), from ἀνά (ana, “up to”) + λόγος (logos, “ratio”).

    From Wiktionary