Abraid meaning

1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XIII, l.

But from his study he at last abray'd,Call'd by the hermit old...

verb
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(intransitive, archaic) To spring, start, make a sudden movement. [from 11th c.]
verb
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Alternative form of abread.
adverb
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Origin of abraid

  • From Middle English abraiden, abreiden (“to start up, awake, move, reproach”), from Old English ābreġdan (“to move quickly, vibrate, draw, draw from, remove, unsheath, wrench, pull out, withdraw, take away, draw back, free from, draw up, raise, lift up, start up”), from Proto-Germanic *uz- (“out”) + *bregdaną (“to move, swing”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrēḱ-, *bhrēǵ- (“to shine”), equivalent to a- +‎ braid. Related to Dutch breien (“to knit”), German bretten (“to knit”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English abrede. More at abread.
    From Wiktionary