Ablative meaning

ăblə-tĭv
Of, relating to, or being a grammatical case indicating separation, direction away from, sometimes manner or agency, and the object of certain verbs. It is found in Latin and other Indo-European languages.
adjective
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The ablative case.
noun
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A word in this case.
noun
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Of, relating to, or capable of ablation.
adjective
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Tending to ablate.
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Designating, of, or in a case expressing removal, deprivation, direction away from, source, cause, or agency.
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That ablates, as the protective coating material on the nose cone of a space missile.
adjective
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The ablative case: this case is expressed by inflection in languages such as Latin, Sanskrit, and Hungarian.
noun
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A word or phrase in this case.
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(grammar) Applied to one of the cases of the noun in some languages, the fundamental meaning of the case being removal, separation, or taking away, and to a lesser degree, instrument, place, accordance, specifications, price, or measurement. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
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(engineering, nautical) Sacrificial, wearing away or being destroyed in order to protect the underlying, as in ablative paints used for antifouling. [First attested in 1959.].
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(medicine) Relating to the removal of a body part, tumor, or organ. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
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(geology) Relating to the erosion of a land mass; relating to the melting or evaporation of a glacier. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
adjective
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(grammar) The ablative case. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
noun
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An ablative material. [Mid 20th century.]
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Origin of ablative

  • Middle English from Latin ablātīvus from ablātus carried away ablation

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From ablation

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French ablatif (“the ablative case”), from Latin ablātīvus (“expressing removal”), from Latin ablātus (“taken away”), from Latin auferō (“I take away”). The engineering/nautical sense is a back-formation from ablate.

    From Wiktionary