U-s-intelligence-community meaning

Comprises 15 agencies, including the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), with its clandestine spies and numerous analysts, and the large Defense Intelligence Agency, which specializes in intercepting global communications.Other intelligence-gathering groups in the United States include the FBI, the National Security Agency (NSA), the Military (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps), the Department of State Bureau of Intelligence and Research, the Department of Energy Atomic Energy Commission, the Department of Treasury Office of Intelligence Support, and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency.Collectively, these organizations spend more than $40 billion annually. As with the CIA, they had been criticized by U.S. citizens for failing to anticipate and thwart the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Also, they had been accused of incorrectly assessing the existence of banned weapons of mass destruction under former dictator Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq, the argument posited by the U.S. and British governments for waging the war in Iraq.It seems that in recent times, the U.S. Intelligence community has been focusing on the security of the Internet. For example, on August 15, 2005, the second-in-command public official at the Pentagon sent a letter to department leaders advising them to “Fight the Net.” He said in the letter that he wants all staffers using a computer to take personal responsibility for protecting the Global Information Grid, a network connecting the Department of Defense and war-fighting systems. Tips in the letter included using information assurance “best practices,” eliminating unsecured software such as P2P file-sharing and remote access, and minimizing access privileges with need-to-know criteria.Moreover, on February 16, 2005, U.S. President George W. Bush decided to strengthen the leadership of the U.S. Intelligence community. President Bush nominated John Negroponte, aged 65, to be the Director of National Intelligence, a new post intended to protect the United States from present-day terrorist threats. Negroponte had been an ambassador to Iraq. He also previously served as ambassador to the United Nations and had eight diplomatic posts in Asia, Latin America, and Europe. In his new role, Negroponte oversees the 15 intelligence agencies and manages a multi-billion-dollar budget.See Also: Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); Department of State Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR); Department of Treasury Office of Intelligence Support (OIS); National Security Agency (NSA); Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) or National Geospatial-Intelligence.Koring, P. Bush Picks New Chief for Battered CIA. The Globe and Mail, August 11, 2004, p. A1, A9; Stout, D. and Glassman, M. Bush Names New Spy Chief. The Globe and Mail, February 18, 2005, p. A18; Tiboni, F. DOD Fights Net. [Online, January 21, 2005.] FCW Media Group Website. http://www.fcw.com/fcw/articles/2005/0117/web-wolf-01-21-05.asp.
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