Sandbox-or-sandbox-security-model definitions

Provides an alternative for ensuring that software not coming from the usual trusted sources can be assessed. Thus, the sandbox model lets users accept code from any source. As it is running, the sandbox restricts code from untrusted sources to be able to take actions that could possibly harm a system. The advantage is that users do not need to determine what code they can or cannot trust. Also, they do not need to scan for viruses, for the sandbox prevents any viruses or other malicious code invited into the system from doing any damage they may have been designed to do. Users need to trust software before they run it on their computers, or face the possibility of their experiencing some dire consequences. Traditionally, users have achieved relative security by being careful to use software only from trusted sources and by regularly scanning their systems for known viruses and worms. When viruses or worms have access to a user’s system, they can gain full control. If the virus or software is malicious code, it can cause much damage to the user’s system because no restrictions would be placed on the software by the computer’s runtime environment. Venners, B. Java’s Security Architecture. [Online, July, 1997.] Artima Software, Inc. Website. http://www.artima.com/underthehood/overviewsecurity2.html.
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