Back-door meaning

A secret way to take control of a computer. Also called "trap doors," back doors are built into software by the original programmer, who can gain access to the computer by entering a code locally or remotely. For example, a back door in an application would enable a person to activate either normal or hidden functions within the software. A back door in an operating system would provide access to all system functions in the computer. See encryption backdoor, Easter Egg and Back Orifice.
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A means of gaining access to a computer program or system by bypassing the normal authentication and other security procedures and mechanisms. Programmers often create back doors so that they can fix bugs and speed development work. If the back door code is left in place when the software goes into general release, it creates a considerable security risk. See also authentication, bug, and Clipper Chip.
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