Arpanet meaning

ärpə-nĕt
The precursor to the Internet was a network called the ARPANET project. Here's how it started: Connecting computers across a wide distance was demonstrated in 1966 to the Applied Research Project Agency (ARPA). Developers wanted to create a wide network that could connect the private corporations and universities to each other. This would allow greater collaboration between facilities and researchers. The first application of ARPANET as a network of computers was used to allow the sharing of processor time on the limited number of computers that were available. The idle processor time could be shared with researchers over a vast distance. This worked well but was only the tip of the iceberg of capability of the network. Examining the capabilities of the ARPANET system, with hindsight it is easy to see the future capabilities and easy to understand that this was the precursor to the Internet. This preliminary work all occurred in 1966. The growth of users on the ARPANET was exponential. In 1974, there were 62 computers connected together. The growth continued rapidly and 111 computers were connected by the end of 1977. Starting in 1983, ARPANET started to divide into networks which were more geared to the needs of their users.

In 1983, MILNET- the military network that had been one of the first users- separated from ARPANET for security reasons, but continued to connect military installations for non-classified information.

In 1985, most universities were shifted from ARPANET to the new NSFnet. This facilitated communication among researchers at various universities.

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In 1985, the ARPNET network branched to networks outside of North America and spread to Europe and Australia. The first declaration that this network had become the Internet was in 1990. At that point, there were 300,000 computers connected and ARPANET was officially disbanded.
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A computer network developed by the Advanced Research Project Agency (now the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency) in the 1960s and 1970s as a means of communication between research laboratories and universities. ARPANET was the predecessor to the Internet.
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(Advanced Research Projects Agency NETwork) The research network funded by the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) that was the precursor to the Internet. The project was conceived in 1966 by ARPA employee Robert Taylor, who wanted to share information among researchers at major universities.The software was developed by Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), and Honeywell 516 minicomputers were the first hardware used as packet switches. ARPAnet was launched in 1969 at two University of California campuses, the Stanford Research Institute and the University of Utah.In late 1972, the ARPAnet was demonstrated at the International Conference on Computers in Washington, DC. This was the first public demonstration of packet switching.TCP/IP Was AddedOver the next decade, ARPAnet spawned other networks, and in 1983 with more than 300 computers connected, its protocols were changed to TCP/IP. In that same year, the unclassified military MILNET network was split off from ARPAnet.It Became the InternetAs TCP/IP and gateway technologies matured, more disparate networks were connected, and the ARPAnet became known as "the Internet" and "the Net." Starting in 1987, the National Science Foundation began developing a high-speed backbone between its supercomputer centers. Intermediate networks of regional ARPAnet sites were formed to hook into the backbone, and commercial as well as non-profit network service providers were formed to handle the operations. Over time, other federal agencies and organizations formed backbones that linked in.The Big ShiftIn 1995, commercial Internet service providers took control of the major backbones, and the Internet grew exponentially. See Internet and packet switching.
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The first generation of the Internet, which consisted of electronic mail and software that allowed users to transfer files. The second generation of the Internet is the World Wide Web, which allows people to connect to databases in addition to Arpanet services. Today, the third generation of the Internet allows people to connect directly to the Internet’s computers via software.
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Generally accepted as the first (1971) sophisticated packet network architecture,ARPANET was designed to link computers on a time-share basis in order to share computer resources more cost-effectively in support of various defense, higher education, and research and development organizations. In 1983, the majority of ARPANET users spun off to form the Defense Data Network (DDN), also called MILNET (Military Network), which included European and Pacific Rim continents. Locations in the United States and Europe that remained with ARPANET then merged with the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency Network to become DARPA Internet.
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